Historyfan

On the 29th of July 1914, one hundred years ago today, the first shots of the First World War were fired! Gun boats from the Austro-Hungarian Navy on the River’s Danube and Sava fired upon the Serbian capital of Belgrade, one day after Austria-Hungary had declared war upon its neighbour.

minutemanworld:

This ship was discovered underneath the World Trade Center in 2010 as construction crews were clearing the ground for the rebuilding projects. The ship has been dated to 1773 and was built in Philadelphia from the same type of trees as were used to build Independence Hall.

I had no idea about this.

thegentlemanscloset:

Beautiful example of an 18th century button with fantastic detail of the back of the button showing the linen thread holding the parts together

Lovey and soo intricate.

Astonishing photos of scenes from Britain during the First World War overlaid with their modern counterparts.

A beautifully and on the money account of what living with an illness or disability can feel like.

One hundred years ago today on the 28th Of July 1914, Austro-Hungary declared war on the Kingdom of Serbia. This would begin the final steps that would lead to the the First World War or Great War.

Women at work in the Elswick Works of Armstrong-Whitworth and Co.
1916.

Tyne and Wear Achives.
Photo by Horace Nicholls

Women at work in the Elswick Works of Armstrong-Whitworth and Co.
1916.

Tyne and Wear Achives.
Photo by Horace Nicholls

Picketts’s Charge being received by Union troops in a print entitled Battle of Gettysburg. 

Print by L Prang and Co. 1887.
The original painting was entitled Hancock at Gettysburg and was by Thure de Thulstrup.

Picketts’s Charge being received by Union troops in a print entitled Battle of Gettysburg.

Print by L Prang and Co. 1887.
The original painting was entitled Hancock at Gettysburg and was by Thure de Thulstrup.

Fascinating read regarding the discovery of a letter detailing a private conversation between King a George V and the British Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey just two day before Britain declared war on August 4th 1914.

In the conversation the uncertain state of the British government is discussed to which the King says “you have got to find a reason, Grey”.

The funeral procession of King Albert of Saxony outside the Palace of Sibyllenort, Lower Silesia.
1902.

The procession moved from the palace to the train station from where the body of the late King was transported to Dresden for internment.

The funeral procession of King Albert of Saxony outside the Palace of Sibyllenort, Lower Silesia.
1902.

The procession moved from the palace to the train station from where the body of the late King was transported to Dresden for internment.